[P4877] The Exegetical Tradition of Avicenna's Canon of Medicine

Created by Kamran Karimullah
Sunday, 11/19/17 1:00pm

SUMMARY:

Avicenna (980-1037) is the towering figure in the history of medieval philosophy and medicine. His massive medical encyclopaedia, the Canon of Medicine, exercised an enormous influence on the development of medical theory and practice both East and West. Yet, little has been done to assess the mechanics of how it was read, commented upon and adapted in the post-classical Arabic tradition. In philosophy, several scholars have begun to document the exegetical mechanics that drive textual and conceptual evolution in the post-classical philosophical commentary tradition. Current work on Arabic commentaries on the Hippocratic Aphorisms project confirms that similar trends exist in post-classical Arabic medicine. Likewise, a series of recent publications tracing Ibn al-Naf?s' (d. 1288) influence in the post-classical period shows that the commentary tradition based on the Canon and its epitomes promises rich pickings for historians of philosophy and medicine alike. This panel offers a number of vignettes to study this rich corpus of medical-philosophical texts and the exegetical mechanisms that drove it.

DISCIPLINES:

Medicine/Health

ABSTRACTS:

MEMBERS:

Robert J. Wisnovsky

(McGill University)
Panel Participating Role(s): Discussant;

Nahyan Fancy

(DePauw University)
Panel Participating Role(s): Presenter;

Peter E. Pormann

(University of Manchester)
Panel Participating Role(s): Presenter;

Kamran Karimullah

(University of Manchester)
Panel Participating Role(s): Organizer; Presenter;
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Hammood Obaid

(University of Manchester)
Panel Participating Role(s): Presenter;

Emma Gannagé

(Georgetown University)
Panel Participating Role(s): Presenter;