[P4886] Colonialism and Culinary Cultures in the Middle East and North Africa

Created by Graham Cornwell
Tuesday, 11/21/17 1:00pm

SUMMARY:

These papers take food and drink as a starting point for exploring the interplay between the material and the social in the Middle East and North Africa, both during and after the colonial period. We ask how colonial processes and actors both conceptualized and changed cultures of food and consumption in the region; in what ways were these changes the consequences of direct interventions in the economy by the colonial state apparatus? In which cases were they the product of informal borrowings--an example of the hybrid forms that define colonial cultures? Just as colonial regimes sought to control the material of food production and consumption (ingredients, spaces, technology), they often also sought to shape the social and cultural meanings of consumption. How did local populations and colons alike create new meanings of consumption in the context of colonial rule?

In this panel, we investigate how the process of colonization helped create new dishes, spaces of eating and drinking, social norms, and cooking techniques. We trace the development of national and regional cuisines and dishes through the colonial experience. At the same time, we look at how local and foreign populations reimagined older dishes and techniques and re-appropriated them in new cultural contexts. Finally, we offer comparisons between different colonial contexts across the Middle East and North Africa and between different periods of colonial rule in the region.

DISCIPLINES:

Hist

ABSTRACTS:

MEMBERS:

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Stacy E. Holden

(Purdue University)
Stacy E. Holden completed her Ph.D. in History at Boston University in 2005. Her professional activities have led her to study Arabic in Tunisia, do work for the US Embassy in Mauritania, examine preservation projects in Egypt, and research colonial architecture...
Panel Participating Role(s): Discussant;

Sylvie Durmelat

(Georgetown University)
Panel Participating Role(s): Presenter;
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Graham Cornwell

(Georgetown University)
I am a doctoral candidate in the History Department at Georgetown University. His dissertation project, "Sweetening the Pot: A History of Tea and Taste in Northwest Africa, 1850-1960" examines how imported Chinese green tea and refined sugar from the...
Panel Participating Role(s): Organizer; Presenter;

Anny Gaul

(Georgetown University)
Panel Participating Role(s): Organizer; Presenter;
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Kelly Hammond

(University of Arkansas)
I received my PhD in East Asian History from Georgetown University in 2015. I am assistant professor in the department of History at the University of Arkansas. I am working on my first book called "China's Muslims and Japan's Empire". I am also the book...
Panel Participating Role(s): Presenter;